Daily Current Affairs Notes for 16-Nov-2022 By GyanOK.com

16 November 2022

International Day for Tolerance observed on 16 November

International Day for Tolerance is observed on November 16 every year with an aim to build tolerance among diverse cultures and spread the message that tolerance is an integral part of society.

International Day for Tolerance observed on 16 November

Overview

International Day for Tolerance 2022:

International Day for Tolerance is observed on November 16 every year with an aim to build tolerance among diverse cultures and spread the message that tolerance is an integral part of society. The day is specifically recognized to educate people about the harmful consequences of intolerant society and its impact on the nation.

International Day of Tolerance: Significance

The significance of celebrating the day is to raise awareness about the tolerance and its impact on cultures and socio-economic groups. Tolerance should be promoted on both personal as well as professional level to make the world a better place to live. Tolerance and non-violence are essential criteria for cohabitation. The goal of the day is to get people to appreciate the beauty of many viewpoints, ethnicities, faiths, and ideologies while also recognising the cultural diversity that exists. The main goals of this global movement are to promote the behaviour of respecting others’ rights and freedoms and to inform people about the negative repercussions of intolerance.

International Day of Tolerance: History

The UN General Assembly adopted Resolution 51/95 proclaiming November 16 as International Day for Tolerance back in 1996. The action followed the adoption of a Declaration of Principles on Tolerance by UNESCO’s Member States on the same day in 1995. In 1995, the UN paid tribute to Mahatma Gandhi on his 125th birth anniversary by kickstarting the commemoration of International Tolerance Day.

Madanjeet Singh, who was the UN’s goodwill ambassador in 2000, sponsored the celebrations that year. He had contributed immensely to bring about communal harmony and peace. Thus, the UNESCO created a prize for the promotion of tolerance and non-violence named the UNESCO-Madanjeet Singh Prize. This prize recognizes and rewards people who made significant contributions in the scientific, artistic, cultural or communication fields to promote the spirit of tolerance and non-violence.

Important takeaways for all competitive exams:

  • UNESCO Headquarters: Paris, France;
  • UNESCO Founded: 16 November 1945, London, United Kingdom;
  • UNESCO Director-General: Audrey Azoulay.

 

 

 

 

 

U-19 Men’s T-20 World Cup 2024 to be Hosted by Sri Lanka

International Cricket Council (ICC) has announced the venue for Under-19 Men's and Women's T-20 World cup.

Sri Lanka Will host the 2024 Men's U-19 World Cup

Overview

International Cricket Council (ICC) has announced the venue for Under-19 Men’s and Women’s T-20 World cup. ICC announced that the 2024 Under -19 men’s T-20 World Cup will be hosted by Sri Lanka while the 2026 edition will be staged in Zimbabwe and Namibia.

The 2025 Under -19 women’s T20 World Cup will be held in Malaysia and Thailand, and 2027 Under -19 women’s event will be jointly hosted by Bangladesh and Nepal.

U-19 Men’s T-20 World Cup 2024 to be Hosted by Sri Lanka- Key Points

  • The hosts are selected via a competitive bidding process overseen by a Board sub-committee chaired by Martin Snedden.
  • ICC also declared the qualification pathway for the 10-team 2024 women’s T20 World Cup.  Eight teams will qualify for the event automatically comprising the top three teams from each group from 2023, T20 World Cup.
  • The remaining two teams will be identified through the 10-team ICC Women’s T20 World Cup Global Qualifier.
  • The qualification pathway for the 14-team men’s World Cup 2027 was also decided with ten teams gaining automatic qualification.
  • The remaining four teams will qualify via the ICC CWC Global Qualifier.

The Pandemic Fund Officially Launched at G20 Meeting

The G20 Presidency of Indonesia is hosting the official launch of the Pandemic Fund on the margins of the G20 Summit.

The Pandemic Fund Officially Launched at G20 Meeting

Overview

The G20 Presidency of Indonesia is hosting the official launch of the Pandemic Fund on the margins of the G20 Joint Finance and Health Ministers’ Meeting in Bali, Indonesia in the presence of  Joko Widodo, President of Indonesia,

Objective Of The Initiative:

At the launch, the Pandemic Fund, now with new name and logo, will provide the latest progress the Governing Board has made since its establishment on September 8, 2022, to get operational – an important step toward strengthening global health architecture.

Need of The Initiative:

Drawing on lessons from COVID-19, which exposed huge weaknesses and under investment in pandemic prevention, preparedness and response (PPR), particularly in low- and middle-income countries, the Pandemic Fund is intended to strengthen the capacity of these countries to mitigate the risks of future global health threats. It will provide a dedicated stream of long-term financing for PPR and address critical gaps through investments and technical support at the national, regional, and global levels. The Pandemic Fund is also expected to incentivize countries to prioritize this agenda and increase their own efforts.

What Has Been Said:

This is the first time the international community has come together around a funding mechanism dedicated to investing in pandemic prevention, preparedness, and response in developing countries – a testament to multilateralism, said Dr. Chatib Basri, co-Chair of the Pandemic Fund Governing Board. “The Pandemic Fund has a unique and vital role to play in making the world safer. PPR is a global public good that benefits all. Every dollar we mobilize to invest in PPR now in low- and middle-income countries will save lives and financial costs and lead to a more resilient world for years to come.”

More About The Initiative:

Developed with Indonesia’s and Italy’s leadership during their respective G20 presidencies, the Pandemic Fund has US$1.4 billion in seed funding already committed by 24 donors. The World Bank and WHO engaged with a wide range of stakeholders including partner countries, civil society organizations (CSOs), and potential implementing entities to create the Pandemic Fund.

Technical Advisory Panel (TAP):

The TAP, under the leadership of its new Chair Dr Michael Ryan, will assess and make recommendations to the Governing Board on the technical merits of proposals for funding, ensuring linkages to the International Health Regulations (2005) and other internationally endorsed legal frameworks, consistent with a One Health approach, as part of the broader global PPR architecture.

 

 

Mehran Karimi Nasseri who lived in Paris airport for 18 years passes away

An Iranian refugee, Mehran Karimi Nasseri, who lived for 18 years in Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris and whose intriguing tale inspired the 2004 Steven Spielberg film “The Terminal,” passed away.

Mehran Karimi Nasseri who lived in Paris airport for 18 years passes away_40.1

Overview

An Iranian refugee, Mehran Karimi Nasseri, who lived for 18 years in Charles de Gaulle Airport in Paris and whose intriguing tale inspired the 2004 Steven Spielberg film “The Terminal,” passed away in that same airport. The cause of death, in Terminal 2F, was a heart attack, a representative for the airport. His exact age was not immediately known, but he was in his late 70s.

His days were punctuated by the rhythm of flights and the presence of travelers, whose numbers swelled in the morning and dwindled at night, leaving him mostly alone to sleep on his preferred curved bench. Airport employees would routinely give him their meal coupons, and flight attendants would give him toiletries left over by first-class passengers. The New York Times Magazine noted in a 2003 profile of Mr. Nasseri that he seemed “both settled — and ready to go.”

Why Mehran Karimi Nasseri lived in that airport?

  • Early on, he said he was expelled from his homeland for antigovernment activity in 1977 because, as a student in England, he had protested against the government of Shah Mohammed Reza Pahlavi. When he returned to Iran, he found himself imprisoned and soon exiled, he said.

  • He bounced around Europe for a few years with temporary refugee papers before arriving in Belgium, where he was given official refugee status in 1981. Mr. Nasseri traveled to Britain and France without difficulty until 1988, when he arrived at Charles de Gaulle Airport with a one-way ticket to London, a few clothes, about $500 and no passport.

  • He told the airport authorities that his papers had been stolen at a Paris train station. Waiving the usual rules, the authorities let him fly to Heathrow Airport in London. But there, British immigration officials refused to let him enter the country, and he was returned to Charles de Gaulle.

  • Mr. Nasseri could not prove who he was or offer proof of his refugee status, so he moved into a holding area in the airport for travelers without papers.

  • He was there for days, and then weeks and months. As the months turned into years, Mr. Nasseri became trapped in a legal twilight zone. In the 1990s, the French authorities insisted that he was on French soil illegally, but they could not deport him because no country would accept him.